PEEL-OUT, PAUL! – DUXBURY (1971)

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The year is 1971. American Photo Colorizing offers special reduced prices for family photo colorizing. Most high school yearbook photos were black & white through the 1970s. We’re featuring several such yearbook photos over the coming week – of my own 1972 graduating class from Duxbury High School in Massachusetts. Here, one of our star athletes, Paul McGarigal poses with his muscle car (I think it was a Gran Torino) in September 1971.

Paul McGarigal (1971)

1971 - Paul McGarigal - Duxbury

BLAKEMAN’S – DUXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS

Duxbury is located north of Plymouth, and was the hometown of many of the original pilgrims who came over on the Mayflower, like Myles Standish, John Alden and Priscilla Alden. This photo of Paul was scanned from the yearbook, and only measured about 3″ across. Even at this small size, it provided a fairly clean image for colorizing. Seems like yesterday we posed for these photos.

Blakeman's - Duxbury Beach

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos.

Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!

GERONIMO!

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The year is 1886. The legend of Geronimo really begins in 1858, when Mexican soldiers led by Colonel Jose Maria Carrasco attacked the Apaches, murdering Geronimo’s wife, mother and children. Upon discovering his slain family, Geronimo became determined to seek revenge. He was an intelligent and brave fighter, who successfully thwarted Mexican and U.S. troops for three decades.

Geronimo surrendered to General Nelson A. Miles on September 4, 1886. He was the last native chief to surrender. Our featured photo of Geronimo was likely taken shortly after his surrender. General Miles called Geronimo “one of the brightest, most resolute, determined-looking men I have ever encountered.”

Here’s an unexpected tidbit about Geronimo’s latter years. According to “Geronimo, His Own Story”, published by Ballantine Books, Geronimo wrote the following, “I have adopted the Christian religion. I believe that the church has helped me much during the short time I have been a member. I am not ashamed to be a Christian, and I am glad to know that the President of the United States is a Christian, for without the help of the Almighty I do not think he could rightly judge in ruling so many people. I have advised all of my people who are not Christians, to study that religion, because it seems to me the best religion in enabling one to live right.”

We’ve featured just a few moments from the life of Geronimo, to provide a little background for today’s photo. His was a fascinating life, and a tragic one in so many ways. It is only fitting that he be remembered in full-color.

Geronimo 1886 (R1)

1886 - Geronimo!

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos.

Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!

TOPPER RETURNS (1854)

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The year is 1854. Topper returns in this wonderful daguerreotype photo. This gent must be wearing what was considered “GQ” in his day. And just moments later, he paid the photographer, walked through the front door of his establishment – and out into a world of horse-drawn carriages, gas lamps, and more fellows in top hats.

The Republican Party was founded in America this year – and it’s easy to imagine them adjourning the meeting and declaring a 30-day recess.

The Boston Public Library opened on March 20, 1854. The Crimean War began a week later, as the United Kingdom and France declared war on Russia. In London, a cholera epidemic killed 10,000 citizens. The U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis graduated its first class, and the American composer and music conductor, John Philip Souza was born.

So, life went on just as it does 160 years later – the best of times and the worst of times, as Charles Dickens would say.

1854 - Man with Top Hat (O)

1854 - Topper Returns

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos. Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!

GIRL & TUDOR HOUSE (1900)

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The year is 1900. Something tells me this photo may have been taken in England, rather than the United States. It could be the English garden, or the English Tudor home. Then again, it might just be Dayton, Ohio. The original is scratched, pockmarked – even a bit blurry – it’s also more elongated than our standard photo dimensions – so, I added scenery on the right side of my colorized version to bring the size into conformity. Despite the damage to be repaired, and the alterations, I think it turned out just fine – a nice representation of Victorian country life at the turn of the 20th century.

Girl & Tudor House (1900) (O)

1900 - Girl & Tudor House

Brnging color back to historical moments and times long ago is why American Photo Colorizing was founded, established, institutionalized (???) . . . Our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos. Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!

BRONX BOMBER, JOE LOUIS (1942)

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The year is 1942. Joe Louis – the Bronx Bomber was without question, the greatest boxer of the 20th century. Great in the ring. Great outside the ring. He was the reigning heavy-weight champ from 1937 to 1949. His greatest victory came on June 22, 1938 in a rematch with German boxer, Max Schmeling at New York’s Yankee Stadium.

Adolph Hitler was once again using sports to prove the superiority of the German Aryans – apparently not learning his lesson after black American track & field star, Jesse Owens won 4 gold medals in the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Anti-Nazi fervor was running high, and all America was looking to Joe to settle the score. The bout was more about Democracy vs. The Third Reich than about Louis and Schmeling.

It took the Bronx Bomber all of 124 seconds to win a first round TKO. Joe Louis became an instant national hero, loved by all Americans, regardless of nationality. When World War II broke out, Joe enlisted in the Army – putting on boxing exhibitions to help build the morale of the troops. Here then, is Joe Louis, in uniform back in 1942. A true American hero who looks even better in full-color.

1942 - Bronx Bomber, Joe Louis (O)

1942 - Bronx Bomber, Joe Louis

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time for you to “Go Color” with your antique family photos. Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!

LINCOLN FUNERAL PROCESSION (1865)

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The year is 1865. This is Abraham Lincoln’s funeral procession, as it winds down Broadway in New York City on April 25th. The red house on the corner belonged to Cornelius van Schaack Roosevelt, grandfather of future U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt.

Now, if you’ll turn your attention to the second-story window at the side of the red house – you’ll see two little boys watching the proceedings below. They happen to be 6 1/2 year-old Teddy Roosevelt (right) and his 5 year-old brother, Elliot.

In the 1950s, Stefan Lorant came upon the photo while conducting research for a book on Abraham Lincoln . He asked Edith Roosevelt about it.

She replied, ““Yes, I think that is my husband, and next to him his brother,” she exclaimed. “That horrible man! I was a little girl then and my governess took me to Grandfather Roosevelt’s house on Broadway so I could watch the funeral procession. But as I looked down from the window and saw all the black drapings I became frightened and started to cry. Theodore and Elliott were both there. They didn’t like my crying. They took me and locked me in a back room. I never did see Lincoln’s funeral”. (Source: National Archives)

Now, the original photograph wasn’t crisp enough to create a realistic colorized image, so it has shades of a painting about it. But, it’s such an historic photo, I couldn’t resist giving it the best color treatment possible. I also took the liberty of removing the black funeral bunting from under the front windows on the second-story, as they weren’t clearly-defined, and distracted from the appearance of the house. Still, for what it is, I’m happy.

At American Photo Colorizing.com, Our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time for you to “Go Color” with your antique family photos. Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!

* Just in case there are one or two of you who weren’t aware of this – the Teddy Bear was named for Teddy Roosevelt.

1865 - Teddy Roosevelt - Lincoln Funeral, NYC (R1)

1865 - Teddy Roosevelt - Lincoln Funeral, NYC (Best)

AMAZIN’ CASEY STENGEL (1915)

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The year is 1915. The Brooklyn Dodgers outfielder is Charles Dillon Stengel, better known to New York fans as “Casey” Stengel – then a lad of just 25 years. I say this because Casey always looked “old”. He was dubbed “The Old Perfessor” at the ripe old age of 24. His major league career stretched from 1912 to 1965. Casey Stengel is an American “original”. There’s never been anyone in baseball quite like him – and no way to do justice to this baseball icon in just a few paragraphs.

1915  - Casey Stengel (O)

Playing for Pittsburgh in 1919 against his former Dodgers teammates – Casey came to bat amid the roar of heckling Brooklyn fans. Not one to be discouraged, Casey turned to the crowd, doffed his cap, and out flew a sparrow! The jeers turned to cheers, and Casey’s reputation for the unexpected was born.

1915 - Casey Stengel - Brooklynn

But, Casey’s real legend was as manager of the New York Yankees (1949-1960) and the Amazin’ Mets (1962-65). The Old Perfessor led the Yankees to 5 straight World Series Championships. In 1962 he returned to baseball after a two-year retirement, to manage the irrepressible New York Mets – the losingest team in baseball.

000 - METSIE

In their first season, 1962, “The Amazins” won 40 games, while losing 120. Casey, in his usual bemused manner, told sports reporters, “I’ve been in this game a hundred years, but I see new ways to lose I never knew existed before”. And yet, The Mets became New York’s lovable underdogs. Their fans packed the Polo Grounds in 1962-63, and later, at Shea Stadium. They came with horns. They came with colorful banners that lined the park. It was a three-ring circus, with Casey as ringmaster.

000 - Casey & Mickey 360

In the New York area, Casey was a celebrity. Casey’s witticisms were known as “Stengelese” – and they filled the sports pages. He was a sports editor’s dream. So, here’s a tip of the cap (sans sparrow) to one of the most colorful characters of major league baseball lore.

Casey was your grandfather – IF your grandfather was Popeye the Sailor Man. The resemblance was uncanny.

Casey Stengel Ad (1963)

“Colorful characters” like Casey Stengel are just one reason why American Photo Colorizing was founded, established, institutionalized (???) . . . Our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos. Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!

IN OTHER NEWS: We had a big party this week to celebrate David’s birthday. Here’s a pic of Sales Exec, Sally Maynard smashing a chocolate cream pie in David’s face. We really know how to have a party here at American Photo Colorizing.com!

David & Sally Pie Face (March 16, 2014) 720x540 dpi