LINCOLN FUNERAL PROCESSION (1865)

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The year is 1865. This is Abraham Lincoln’s funeral procession, as it winds down Broadway in New York City on April 25th. The red house on the corner belonged to Cornelius van Schaack Roosevelt, grandfather of future U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt.

Now, if you’ll turn your attention to the second-story window at the side of the red house – you’ll see two little boys watching the proceedings below. They happen to be 6 1/2 year-old Teddy Roosevelt (right) and his 5 year-old brother, Elliot.

In the 1950s, Stefan Lorant came upon the photo while conducting research for a book on Abraham Lincoln . He asked Edith Roosevelt about it.

She replied, ““Yes, I think that is my husband, and next to him his brother,” she exclaimed. “That horrible man! I was a little girl then and my governess took me to Grandfather Roosevelt’s house on Broadway so I could watch the funeral procession. But as I looked down from the window and saw all the black drapings I became frightened and started to cry. Theodore and Elliott were both there. They didn’t like my crying. They took me and locked me in a back room. I never did see Lincoln’s funeral”. (Source: National Archives)

Now, the original photograph wasn’t crisp enough to create a realistic colorized image, so it has shades of a painting about it. But, it’s such an historic photo, I couldn’t resist giving it the best color treatment possible. I also took the liberty of removing the black funeral bunting from under the front windows on the second-story, as they weren’t clearly-defined, and distracted from the appearance of the house. Still, for what it is, I’m happy.

At American Photo Colorizing.com, Our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time for you to “Go Color” with your antique family photos. Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!

* Just in case there are one or two of you who weren’t aware of this – the Teddy Bear was named for Teddy Roosevelt.

1865 - Teddy Roosevelt - Lincoln Funeral, NYC (R1)

1865 - Teddy Roosevelt - Lincoln Funeral, NYC (Best)

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2 thoughts on “LINCOLN FUNERAL PROCESSION (1865)

  1. Regarding that photo. It is true that is Theodore Roosevelt in the window as a 6-year old boy. There are varying accounts as to whether that is Elliot Roosevelt or perhaps Theodore is standing with his then childhood playmate and future 2nd wife, Edith Carrow. He makes reference to watching the Lincoln funeral with Edith as children in his autobiography. Which makes this that much more of a remarkable photo in my opinion.

    T.R. was the distant (5th) cousin of FDR. Eleanor Roosevelt was indeed Teddy’s niece. The daughter of his brother Elliot Roosevelt. Franklin’s father James Roosevelt was introduced to his mother Sara Delano at a party given by Theodore Roosevelt.

    There are more interesting presidential facts about all the U.S. Presidents, including the 26th and 32nd at 10presidentialfacts.com as well as some good presidential biography recommendations.

    • It’s always a treat when a history-buff comes along to fill in the gaps. In the 1950s, Stefan Lorant came upon the photo and asked Edith Roosevelt about it. She replied, ““Yes, I think that is my husband, and next to him his brother,” she exclaimed. “That horrible man! I was a little girl then and my governess took me to Grandfather Roosevelt’s house on Broadway so I could watch the funeral procession. But as I looked down from the window and saw all the black drapings I became frightened and started to cry. Theodore and Elliott were both there. They didn’t like my crying. They took me and locked me in a back room. I never did see Lincoln’s funeral”.

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