BOSTON MYSTERY WOMAN (1850)

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The year is 1850. Here’s a marvelous daguerreotype of an unknown Boston woman, taken by Southworth & Hawes. As you can see, the clarity is amazing for 164 years ago. Albert Sands Southworth and Josiah Johnson Hawes are considered the fathers of photography as an artform. Color of course is by us troublemakers at American Photo Colorizing.com

1850 - Boston Mystery Woman (O)

1850 - Boston Mystery Woman

BABY BLUE (1850)

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Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog! We colorize black & white photos for museums, media, multi-media, and families like yours.

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The year is 1850. Daguerreotypes are very interesting in their own right. By adding color, what I’m trying to accomplish is a sense of “you are there”. It’s pretty rare to find an early daguerreotype that lends itself well to realistic colorizing. In our gallery we’ve amassed a nice selection of higher quality daguerreotypes I’ve colorized.

Last week I came across this 1850s image of a pretty young lady in her bonnet. As you can see, there’s a lot of pitting that had to be repaired before color could be added. But, I could see that the overall image had nice definition to it. Before colorizing, I decided to extend her body to center her better in the photo. Colorizing took a few attempts, but I finally came up with a fairly lifelike color version. I really enjoy seeing a girl from 165 years ago spring to life in full color – or in shades of blue.

1850s - Baby Blue (O)

1850 - Baby Blue

MYSTERIOUS DIGHTON ROCK (1853)

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The year is 1853. Seth Eastman, a reknown illustrator of Native American life, poses atop Dighton Rock in Massachusetts. The strange writings adorning the rock have been the subject of speculation since the late 1600s, when it was discovered. The most likely explanation is that the markings were inscribed by Portuguese sailors. Dighton Rock’s markings include the Portuguese Coat of Arms, three crosses, the name of the ship’s captain – Miguel Corte Real, and the date 1511. Mystery solved?

1853 - Seth Eastman - Dighton Rock, MA (O1)

1853 - Seth Eastman - Dighton Rock, MA

We colorize black & white photos for museums, media, multi-media, and families like yours. Our online Photo Gallery features 100s of colorized vintage images available for purchase. A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

MY NAME IS JACK (1850)

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The year is 1850. I love black culture. I love the major contributions people of color have made in the areas of science, music, sports, humanities . . . These are peoples toughened by oppression, who overcame the hurdles of life and emerged victorious. Here is a slave photographed in 1850. All anyone seems to know about him is, his name is Jack. Despite his lowly state as a slave, in this portriait, an unshakable sense of dignity and inner strength shines through.

1850 - Slave Named Jack (O)

1850 - My Name Is Jack

We colorize historical photos for museums, media, multimedia producers, educators . . . and for families like yours. Visit our website at: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com
Remember: Your ancestors are counting on you!

BRITISH ACTOR, SAM COWELL (1855)

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Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog! We colorize black & white photos for museums, educators, media . . . . . and families like yours.

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The year is 1855. Sam Cowell, was one of the highest-paid actors of his day. Born in England, but raised in the States, Sam’s signature song was “The Rat Catcher’s Daughter”. We’ve included a rendition by The Seven Dials Band below.

Sam Cowell was adept at playing comic characters as well as performing in the “legitimate” theatre. Cowell’s ‘resume’ included music halls, like The Cyder Cellars and The Coal Hole – to Covent Garden and Canterbury Hall. Years later, he was one of the judges on “Britain’s Got Talent”.

That was SIMON Cowell. Just seeing if you’re paying attention.

1855 - British Actor, Sam Cowell (O - 540x405)

1855 - British Actor, Sam Cowell

Sam Cowell was popular on both sides of The Pond, and with his gift of vocal projection – could be heard above the din of most halls, including Wembley Stadium and New York’s Madison Square Garden, where he went five rounds with Rocky Marciano.

That’s right, I embellished again. But one thing for sure that isn’t an embellishment…

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos. Your ancestors are counting on you!

HERE’S A DAPPER SAM COWELL
Sam Cowell - Dapper 1

“THE RATCATCHER’S DAUGHTER” PERFORMED BY THE SEVEN DIALS BAND

GEORGE LIPPARD (1850)

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Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog. We colorize black & white photos for museums, educators, media . . . and families like yours.

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The year is 1850. George Lippard of Philadelphia, was a controversial writer and social activist. He wrote “historical fictions and legends”. His novel, “The Quaker City” exposed the dark side of Philadelphia’s elite, capitalism and urban growth. He chose to write for the masses, and became one of the highest-paid American writers of his time.

Lippard died in 1854, at age 31 – the victim of tuberculosis. This 1850 daguerreotype photo displays amazing clarity – making it possible for me to create a very realistic color image.

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos.

1850 - George Lippard (O)

1850 - George Lippard

TOPPER RETURNS (1854)

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Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog. We colorize black & white photos for museums, educators, media . . . and families like yours.

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The year is 1854. Topper returns in this wonderful daguerreotype photo. This gent must be wearing what was considered “GQ” in his day. And just moments later, he paid the photographer, walked through the front door of his establishment – and out into a world of horse-drawn carriages, gas lamps, and more fellows in top hats.

The Republican Party was founded in America this year – and it’s easy to imagine them adjourning the meeting and declaring a 30-day recess.

The Boston Public Library opened on March 20, 1854. The Crimean War began a week later, as the United Kingdom and France declared war on Russia. In London, a cholera epidemic killed 10,000 citizens. The U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis graduated its first class, and the American composer and music conductor, John Philip Souza was born.

So, life went on just as it does 160 years later – the best of times and the worst of times, as Charles Dickens would say.

1854 - Man with Top Hat (O)

1854 - Topper Returns

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos. Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!