BOSTON MYSTERY WOMAN (1850)

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Our photo blog features Before and After colorized images from American Photo Colorizing.com. We encourage you to leave your comments, ratings, back links, honorable mentions – if it helps our visibility – we’re happy campers.

Visit our website at: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

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The year is 1850. Here’s a marvelous daguerreotype of an unknown Boston woman, taken by Southworth & Hawes. As you can see, the clarity is amazing for 164 years ago. Albert Sands Southworth and Josiah Johnson Hawes are considered the fathers of photography as an artform. Color of course is by us troublemakers at American Photo Colorizing.com

1850 - Boston Mystery Woman (O)

1850 - Boston Mystery Woman

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MASON’S ISLAND (1865)

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American Photo Colorizing serves museums, television and film producers, print media . . . and families like yours. A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1865. Here’s a photo of Union troops relaxing at Mason’s Island in Washington, DC. On the left is the Georgetown Ferry crossing the Potomac River. My favorite part to colorize was the foreground rocks at left, and the results were very satisfying. The black and white rocks provided a nice 3D effect when color was added.

1865 - Mason's Island - Washington, DC (O)

1865 - Mason's Island

THE BEACH BOYS (1962)

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Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog! We colorize black & white photos for museums, educators, media . . . and families like yours.

A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

Summer is here, and we’re on a Surfin’ Safari back to the year 1962. Here’s a brand new Rock & Roll band from Hawthorne, California in Los Angeles’ South Bay. They call themselves The Beach Boys, and they range in age from 13 to 21.

This photo is from the teen documentary “One Man’s Challenge”, produced by Dale Smallin, and featuring the young Beach Boys performing their song, “Surfin’ Safari” at the Azusa Teen Club.

Due to the nature of the original film we captured the image from – the clarity isn’t pristine. But, what a cool piece of Rock & Roll history!

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos. Your ancestors are counting on you!

1962 - Beach Boys Sing Surfin' Safari (O)

1962 - Beach Boys - Surfin' Safari 1

We just can’t stop there . . . and so, we’re making the original video footage available for you – right here . . . right now!

And since American Photo Colorizing’s “Redwood Studio” is just a few blocks from the blue Pacific in the heart of Southern California – we send out a mighty COWABUNGA to all our local Hodads!

CIVIL WAR – MASON’S ISLAND (1865)

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Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing photo blog.
Visit our website at: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1865. Here’s a photo of Union troops relaxing at Mason’s Island in Washington, DC. On the left is the Georgetown Ferry crossing the Potomac River. And guess who did the photo colorizing? Yes, American Photo Colorizing.com.

My favorite part to colorize was the foreground rocks at left, and the results were very satisfying. The black and white rocks provided a nice 3D effect when color was added.

1865 - Mason's Island - Washington, DC (O)

1865 - Mason's Island

We colorize historical photos for museums, media, multimedia producers, educators . . . and for families like yours. Visit our website at: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com
Remember: Your ancestors are counting on you!

ST. PAUL STREET SCENE (1920)

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Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog! We colorize black & white photos for museums, educators, media . . . . . and families like yours.

A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1920. Here’s a colorful scene from the streets of St. Paul Minnesota. The building in the background is the Germania Life Building. This is a closeup of a much larger photo we’ve colorized for an upcoming book on vintage St. Paul architecture.

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos. Your ancestors are counting on you!

1920 - St. Paul Street Scene (Sepia)

1920 - St. Paul Street Scene

LINDA BY THE LANE – DUXBURY (1971)

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Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog. We colorize black & white photos for museums, educators, media . . . and families like yours.

A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1971. American Photo Colorizing offers special reduced prices for family photo colorizing. Most high school yearbook photos were black & white through the 1970s. We’re featuring several such yearbook photos over the coming week – of my own 1972 graduating class from Duxbury High School in Massachusetts. Here, a blonde, 40s-style beauty, Linda Wadell relaxes on a log amid patches of beach grass in September 1971.

Linda Wadell (1971)

1971 - Linda Wadell - Duxbury

DUXBURY BEACH, MASSACHUSETTS

Duxbury is located north of Plymouth, and was the hometown of many of the original pilgrims who came over on the Mayflower, like Myles Standish, John Alden and Priscilla Alden. This photo of Linda was scanned from the yearbook, and only measured about 3″ across. Even at this small size, it provided a fairly clean image for colorizing. Seems like yesterday we posed for these photos.

Duxbury Beach 1

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos.

Remember . . . your ancestors are counting on YOU!