BOSTON MYSTERY WOMAN (1850)

Art - AC - Blog Photo

Our photo blog features Before and After colorized images from American Photo Colorizing.com. We encourage you to leave your comments, ratings, back links, honorable mentions – if it helps our visibility – we’re happy campers.

Visit our website at: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

Kickstarter Campaign Promo 4

Click For Kickstarter Campaign: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/923710394/colorized-history

The year is 1850. Here’s a marvelous daguerreotype of an unknown Boston woman, taken by Southworth & Hawes. As you can see, the clarity is amazing for 164 years ago. Albert Sands Southworth and Josiah Johnson Hawes are considered the fathers of photography as an artform. Color of course is by us troublemakers at American Photo Colorizing.com

1850 - Boston Mystery Woman (O)

1850 - Boston Mystery Woman

Advertisements

BABY BLUE (1850)

APC - BLOG LOGO (540x540)

Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog! We colorize black & white photos for museums, media, multi-media, and families like yours.

A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1850. Daguerreotypes are very interesting in their own right. By adding color, what I’m trying to accomplish is a sense of “you are there”. It’s pretty rare to find an early daguerreotype that lends itself well to realistic colorizing. In our gallery we’ve amassed a nice selection of higher quality daguerreotypes I’ve colorized.

Last week I came across this 1850s image of a pretty young lady in her bonnet. As you can see, there’s a lot of pitting that had to be repaired before color could be added. But, I could see that the overall image had nice definition to it. Before colorizing, I decided to extend her body to center her better in the photo. Colorizing took a few attempts, but I finally came up with a fairly lifelike color version. I really enjoy seeing a girl from 165 years ago spring to life in full color – or in shades of blue.

1850s - Baby Blue (O)

1850 - Baby Blue

MY NAME IS JACK (1850)

APC - BLOG LOGO (540x540)

Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing photo blog.
Visit our website at: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1850. I love black culture. I love the major contributions people of color have made in the areas of science, music, sports, humanities . . . These are peoples toughened by oppression, who overcame the hurdles of life and emerged victorious. Here is a slave photographed in 1850. All anyone seems to know about him is, his name is Jack. Despite his lowly state as a slave, in this portriait, an unshakable sense of dignity and inner strength shines through.

1850 - Slave Named Jack (O)

1850 - My Name Is Jack

We colorize historical photos for museums, media, multimedia producers, educators . . . and for families like yours. Visit our website at: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com
Remember: Your ancestors are counting on you!

GEORGE LIPPARD (1850)

APC - BLOG LOGO (540x540)

Welcome to the American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog. We colorize black & white photos for museums, educators, media . . . and families like yours.

A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1850. George Lippard of Philadelphia, was a controversial writer and social activist. He wrote “historical fictions and legends”. His novel, “The Quaker City” exposed the dark side of Philadelphia’s elite, capitalism and urban growth. He chose to write for the masses, and became one of the highest-paid American writers of his time.

Lippard died in 1854, at age 31 – the victim of tuberculosis. This 1850 daguerreotype photo displays amazing clarity – making it possible for me to create a very realistic color image.

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos.

1850 - George Lippard (O)

1850 - George Lippard

GREEN BONNET GIRL (1850)

APC Christmas Card 2013 - 1A

Welcome to American Photo Colorizing.com’s photo blog. We colorize black & white photos for museums, media, multi-media, and families like yours. Our online Photo Gallery features 100s of colorized vintage images available for purchase. These images are HD-quality, and can be enlarged to at least 18″x24″. They look beautify when framed or mounted as a canvas wrap.

A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1850. A stylish young lass poses for her portrait. As the British would have said, “She’s posh“. A Brooklyn dockworker might have expressed it so eloquently, “That goil is one classy dame”.

To create the colorized portrait, it was necessary to remove the frame from the image and extend the background a bit. This helped bring the focus to the girl’s face. Then color was added. Unlike the layers of color method used by so many amateur and semi-professional colorizers – our color creations are done as if one was painting on canvas – using the mouse as a brush. This gives our photos a unique appearance – with greater color detail and life-likeness than people are used to seeing in Photo Colorizing.

1850s - Woman In Green Bonnet (O)

1850 - Green Bonnet Girl

HEEEEEEERE’S “GRANNY” (1850)

APC - BLOG LOGO (540x540)

Welcome to American Photo Colorizing .com’s photo blog, “Trending History”. We colorize black & white photos for museums, media, multi-media, and families like yours. Our online Photo Gallery features 100s of colorized vintage images available for purchase.

Christmas will sneak up on you before you know it. It isn’t too early to start looking through your family photo collection. A beautifully-colorized image of your ancestors (suitable for enlarging and framing) makes a wonderful keepsake for the entire family.

A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1850. Somebody’s Granny poses for a portrait with her knitting 163 years ago. The quality of the original daguerreotype is exceptional for the pre-Civil War-era. We’re looking into the eyes of an elderly woman who was very likely born around the time of the American Revolution. Her first president would have been George Washington – and she doesn’t appear to have a tooth in her mouth. “The better to gum you with, my dears”.

Now, here’s the “kicker”. Not only have we colorized “Granny” – but we’ve brought her back to life . . . sort of. Activate your Audio, then Click-tivate the Video below.

1850s - Woman 4 (O)

1850 - Groovy Granny

MY NAME IS JACK (1850)

APC - BLOG LOGO (540x540)

Trending History features Before and After colorized images from American Photo Colorizing.com. We encourage you to leave your comments, ratings, back links, hot links – if it helps our visibility – we like it!

Visit our website at: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1850. I love black culture. I love the major contributions people of color have made in the areas of science, music, sports, humanities . . . These are peoples toughened by oppression, who overcame the hurdles of life and emerged victorious. Here is a slave photographed in 1850. All anyone seems to know about him is, his name is Jack. Despite his lowly state as a slave, in this portriait, an unshakable sense of dignity and inner strength shines through.

1850 - Slave Named Jack (O)

1850 - My Name Is Jack