AN INSECT EXPERT & HIS FAMILY (1934)

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Welcome to the 201st American Photo Colorizing.com photo blog! We colorize black & white photos for museums, educators, media . . . and families like yours.

A visit to our website gets you started: http://www.americanphotocolorizing.com

The year is 1934 . . . give or take. Every now and then we like to feature photos we’ve recently colorized for our customers. Here’s a beautiful family photo of Dr. Frank E. Lutz and his family. Dr. Lutz was the acclaimed entomologist of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. In other words, Dr. Lutz was a famous bug expert . . . rather, a famous expert on bugs (there aren’t many famous bugs, except maybe Bugs Bunny, and we’ll just leave that one there.

Dr. Lutz initiated the world’s first Insect Museum Camp and Marked Nature Trail, in Tuxedo, New York back in 1925. In our photo, Dr. Lutz is seated in back, looking quite scholarly.

2) Family Group Photo 1-A (O)

1940 - Dr. Frank E. Lutz Family

Our thanks for use of this photo goes out to Daniel and Kate W, of Brentwood, Tennessee (we always abbreviate last names to protect the innocent). Daniel is Dr. Lutz’s great-grandson, and Kate is Daniel’s new bride, for which we offer congratulations to both!

Here are Daniel & Kate

Daniel & Kate Whitten (Wedding - 2014) A

At American Photo Colorizing, our goal is to shred the black & white veil that separates us from the exciting, vibrant lives of those who came before us. It’s time to “Go Color” with your vintage and antique family photos. Your ancestors are counting on you!

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